Cardinals Captain

“The ball players know he’s a good one, but nobody else does.”
Hall of Famer Stan Musial speaking about teammate Ken Boyer

Ken Boyer played in the Major Leagues for 15 seasons. Most of Ken Boyer’s success came with the St. Louis Cardinals; he also played with the New York Mets, Chicago White Sox, and Los Angeles Dodgers. Boyer was a seven-time All-Star and a fine third baseman who won five Gold Gloves for fielding excellence. Boyer’s best year was 1964; he batted .295 with 24 home runs and a league leading 119 RBI’s in winning the National League’s Most Valuable Player award. Ken Boyer capped off his great 1964  season by belting two home runs as the Cardinals defeated the New York Yankees in the World Series.

Ken Boyer was a winner. He played well down the stretch as the Cardinals overcame a 6.5 game deficit with 12 games to play to win the NL Pennant in 1964. Boyer also had the biggest hit in that year’s World Series, a grand slam in Game 4 that gave the Cardinals a 4 to 3 victory which evened the Series at 2 games apiece. His numbers were very good, not great, which is why Stan Musial probably made that comment about him. Boyer was consistent; he hit 20 or more homers eight times, and he also came through in the clutch. I got to know Ken when he managed the Tulsa Oilers. He always was very generous with his time, and I learned a great deal from him. Ken Boyer was well respected and well liked and managed the Cardinals for a couple of years. Ken died much too young, at age 51 from cancer.

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